Any architect with the passion to freely explore design ideas can fulfill their wishes without compromising on documentation precision and quality. With ARCHICAD, you can model and shape freely, easily creating the forms you want and easily change even complex elements in the most appropriate view. ARCHICAD enables you to combine creative freedom with the well-known efficiency of its robust Building Information Model. A comprehensive set of tools supports the creative process within the context of the project.

 

ARCHICAD enhances its direct modeling capabilities in the native BIM environment with its end-to-end BIM workflow using Priority Based Connections and Intelligent Building Materials, and an improved MORPH™ tool. Cloud-integration helps users create and find the custom objects, components they need to make their BIM models complete. GRAPHISOFT continues to innovate in “green” as well, uniquely offering the best workflow for sustainable design, integrated into its BIM authoring tool.

3D DESIGN SPACE REINVENTED

 ARCHICAD allows architects to freely explore design ideas without compromising on documentation precision and quality. With ARCHICAD, you can model and shape freely, easily creating the forms you want and change even complex elements in the most appropriate view. ARCHICAD enables you to combine creative freedom with the well-known efficiency of its robust Building Information Model. A comprehensive set of tools supports the creative process within the context of the project. ARCHICAD enhances its direct modeling capabilities in the native BIM environment with its end to- end BIM workflow using Priority Based Connections and Intelligent Building Materials, and an improved MORPH™ tool. Cloud-integration helps users create and find the custom objects and components they need to make their BIM models complete. GRAPHISOFT continues to innovate in “green” as well, uniquely offering the best workflow for sustainable design, integrated into its BIM authoring tool.

 

BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING

 BIM explained in laymen’s terms

 BIM is an acronym that stands for Building Information Modeling. BIM is very much talked about these days in the building industry, but when asked you will receive more or less different definitions from different people?

 

Some say BIM is a type of software. Some say BIM is the 3D virtual model of buildings. Others say BIM is a process or BIM is nothing more than the collection of all building data organized into a structure database easy to query both in a “visual” and a “numerical” way. It is safe to say that BIM is all the above and some more… Now let’s see BIM explained in laymen’s terms. When it comes to BIM everything starts with a 3D digital model of the building. This model, however, is way more than pure geometry and some nice textures cast over it for visualization. A true BIM model consists of the virtual equivalents of the actual building parts and pieces used to build a building. These elements have all the characteristics – both physical and logical – of their real counterparts. These intelligent elements are the digital prototype of the physical building elements such as walls, columns, windows, doors, stairs etc. that allow us to simulate the building and understand its behavior in a computer environment way before the actual construction starts. Nevertheless with the advent of mobile technologies such as iPhones/iPads and the likes utilization of BIM has broken out from the close circle of professionals. Clients, building owners and operators are getting more and more access to BIM models through their mobile devices even without the need to installing a BIM application first. This shift will put the adoption of BIM onto the next level so you as a professional really cannot afford ignoring BIM. Fortunately you are at the best place to learn about BIM so please watch the below video below and read on to get fully prepared for the latest major paradigm shift in our industry.

 

Why should I switch from CAD to BIM?

 BIM and CAD represent two fundamentally different approaches to building design and documentation. CAD (Computer Aided Design) applications imitate the traditional “paper & pencil” process in so far as two-dimensional electronic drawings are created from 2D graphic elements such as lines, hatches and text, etc. CAD drawings, similarly to traditional paper drawings, are created independently from each other so design changes need to be followed up and implemented manually on each CAD drawing. BIM (Building Information Modeling) applications imitate the real building process. Instead of creating drawings from 2D line-work, buildings are virtually modeled from real construction elements such as walls, windows, slabs and roofs, etc. This allows architects to design buildings in a similar way as they are built. Since all data is stored in the central virtual building model, design changes are automatically followed-up on individual drawings generated from the model. With this integrated model approach, BIM not only offers significant productivity increase but also serves as the basis for better-coordinated designs and a computer model based building process. While switching from CAD to BIM is already justified by the benefits achieved during the design phase BIM offers further benefits during the construction and operation of buildings. You can find further information about CAD vs. BIM in Ralph Grabowski’s “CAD & BIM – Is there a Free Pass?” whitepaper.

 

DOCUMENTATION

The best reward for a passionate architect is to see design ideas take on physical form. With GRAPHISOFT® ARCHICAD®’s Building Information Modeling approach, architects can create structurally correct construction details right out of the box – with full confidence.

 

With ARCHICAD, you create 3D Building Information Model — all the necessary documentation and images are created automatically. New, priority-based junctions and intelligent building materials ensure correct graphical representation of elements and materials in sections (cut fills), surfaces in 3D views, and thermal properties throughout the building energy evaluations. ARCHICAD offers a native BIM design and documentation workflow for Renovation and Refurbishment projects common in developing parts of the world. ARCHICAD’s powerful view setting possibilities, its unique drawing handling, together with the integrated publishing capabilities, ensure that printing or saving the various drawing sets of a project won‘t require extra time and will be derived from the same Building Information Model.

 

Priority Based Connections

 ARCHICAD’s Priority Based Connections put a real ROI on the work invested in the creation of the Building Information Model, by automatically providing construction documentation level sections and details.

ARCHICAD users can develop structurally correct details and simplify the modeling and documentation of buildings, even when the design contains an unprecedented level of detail.

ARCHICAD’s end-to-end BIM workflow allows the model to stay live until the very end of the project, saving considerable time at the construction documentation phase.

 

Intelligent Building Materials

 The appropriate and consistent use of building materials is crucial not only when developing the final construction documentation sets, but also when creating building energy analysis reports.

New, intelligent building materials ensure correct graphical representation of materials in sections (cut fills), element surfaces in 3D views, and thermal properties throughout the building energy evaluations.

Cut fill pen colors can be globally defined and applied to any ARCHICAD construction element in the project. This not only simplifies the user interface, but also allows the same material to be used consistently throughout the design project.

 

Element Association to Story Heights

 Automated cross-linking of construction elements may easily result in an ambiguous building project. ARCHICAD enables designers to link certain building elements to stories in an architecturally sound manner.

The height of walls, columns and zones can be linked to a particular story in the project: when the story position changes, the heights of the linked elements will automatically be adjusted. This way, if the story height changes, the height of all linked elements will also be updated automatically.

Architects will still have the option to assign fixed heights to elements, and to define the base elevation height to a given reference level. This ensures that designers will stay in full control of their project.